Proton Mail launches Import Assistant for quick email migration

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We’re happy to announce that you can now use Import Assistant in beta to safely transfer your messages and folders to Proton Mail’s end-to-end encrypted email service. 

Import Assistant is initially accessible to all Proton Mail users with paid plans directly from the web app and it requires no installation or download. In the future, it will support data migration from other types of digital services, helping you swap all your privacy-invasive products with Proton’s encrypted suite of services.

The new migration tool follows the release of a new version of Proton Mail for web that enables persistent sessions and Single Sign-On. These features allow you to remain signed in when you open a new Proton app or after reopening a browser tab, paving the way for using all Proton products as an integrated privacy suite. Now, with Import Assistant beta we’re taking a step further in helping you switch to an online service that protects your privacy.

The tool is fully integrated into Proton Mail V4, and you can immediately start using it through your email Settings by selecting Import & export -> Import Assistant from the menu on the left.   

Proton Mail Import Assistant

Import Assistant lets you import data from up to two email accounts at the same time, and you can transfer messages from any email provider that supports the IMAP protocol. 

When you transfer your emails, the messages are imported automatically in the background. Unlike Proton’s Import-Export app, which needs to remain open for the whole duration of your transfer, with Import Assistant you can use Proton Mail normally, log out, or close the browser while the migration is in progress. 

Because Import Assistant transfers your messages directly to Proton Mail’s servers, you also don’t need to install any download or install any application. Proton Mail encrypts your messages the moment they arrive in your account and no one but you, not even Proton, can then access their content. 

Import Assistant also comes with instructions on how to prepare your Gmail or Yahoo account for import. You can customize your import by choosing the folders you want to migrate, the time range of the imported messages, and any labels you want to apply in your Proton Mail account. 

If you need any help, you can also consult our guide on how to import with Import Assistant.

First step of your journey to digital privacy 

The Import Assistant section in your Settings menu also includes links to Import Calendar and Import Contacts, our two separate apps that support migration. 

In the future, we plan to integrate these tools into Import Assistant to make your transition to Proton’s fully encrypted suite of products as seamless as possible — you will be able to transfer your contacts, calendar events, or emails directly into your Proton account.  

Transferring your emails to Proton is an important first step as you gradually transition from privacy-invasive companies. If you need more help making the switch, check out our migration guides for Gmail, Yahoo, and Outlook

We are eager to get your feedback on Import Assistant to help us improve Proton. Please send us your comments on the new Proton Mail V4 beta inside the web app

To report issues, click Help > Report bug.

Don’t forget to let us know what you think about Import Assistant and all the other features in the new Proton Mail beta on Twitter, Facebook, Reddit, Instagram, and Linkedin.

Thank you to all our users. Your support makes our work possible and keeps us going as we are building an internet where user privacy is the default. 

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Feel free to share your feedback and questions with us via our official social media channels on Twitter and Reddit.

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