Plan events with friends and colleagues with event invitations in Proton Calendar

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Have big plans? Now that you can use the Proton Calendar web app to send and receive event invitations, you can share your plans with anyone. This feature works with Proton Calendar as well as other popular calendars, allowing you to collaborate with colleagues and share your plans with friends, no matter what provider they use. 

This new development is a major step forward for Proton Calendar. Planning a meeting or call is much easier now that you can send colleagues an invitation they can save in their calendar. And with Proton Calendar, your event details are secured with end-to-end encryption. Only you can access the details of your schedule.

While Proton Calendar will be made available to all users, including Free users, Proton Calendar beta is available immediately for users with Plus, Professional, and Visionary plans. If you don’t yet have a paid plan, you can upgrade now and start sending and receiving event invitations immediately.


If you have a paid Proton plan but haven’t started using Proton Calendar yet, you can access the web app by logging in to your Proton account at mail.proton.me and choosing Proton Calendar from the App Selector. (You can also download the Proton Calendar Android app, which is currently in beta, although in-app event invitations are still in development.) 

Once you’ve logged in to Proton Calendar, don’t forget to import your existing calendar events from another provider.

Sending and receiving invitations in Proton Calendar

Proton Calendar makes sending and accepting event invitations quick and simple. With just a couple of clicks, you can set your agenda and make sure everyone is on the same page.

To send an invite, simply add the email address of the person you want to invite in the Add Participants field when you are creating the event.

You can also send invitations to events that you already created by adding their email address to the participant list for that event or uninvite them by deleting their email from the participant list. Once someone has accepted your invitation to an event, they will receive updates if you modify its location or time. You can invite up to 100 participants to a single event.

Learn more about sending event invitations in Proton Calendar

When someone sends you an invitation to an event, you will receive an email in your Proton Mail inbox with the event details. This email also lets you respond to the event’s organizer about whether you will be attending. You can choose Yes, No, or Maybe.

Once you respond to the invitation, Proton Calendar will automatically notify the organizer and add the event to your calendar.

For now, you can only send and receive event invitations with the Proton Calendar web app, but it will be added to the Proton Calendar Android app in the near future.

An encrypted calendar for all your personal moments

You entrust your calendar app with all your upcoming events: your work meetings, big family events, and parties with your friends. The fact that most calendar apps can access and monitor this type of data is invasive and degrades the right to privacy. Only you should be able to access your plans.

Proton Calendar prevents this type of surveillance by encrypting your events using the same end-to-end encryption that we use to protect Proton Mail messages. The title, description, location, and participants of each event are encrypted on your device before they reach our servers, meaning no one but you, not even Proton Mail, can see the details of your events

Help us build a more private internet

We rely on your feedback to guide our development team and to make the privacy-focused tools you want. Please share any suggestions and bug reports with our team. By using the Proton Calendar beta and supporting our work, you’re helping to make privacy more accessible for everyone.

This is just the first of many new features and developments we have planned for 2021. In the coming months, we will release a feature on the web app that allows you to share your calendar with non-Proton users and the Proton Calendar iOS app.

Proton Calendar is just one part of the encrypted ecosystem we’re building. These services give you control over your personal data, allowing you to communicate, plan your life, save important documents, and browse the internet in privacy and security. This is what an internet that puts people first looks like.


Feel free to share your feedback and questions with us via our official social media channels on Twitter and Reddit.

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