ProtonBlog(new window)

Transition assistance for Lavaboom shutdown

Share this page

The news was first broken by Lavaboom developer pzduniak(new window) on Reddit(new window).

Since we are also working on bringing privacy back online, we can understand better than most the many challenges that must be overcome to build a secure email service. The truth is, email is difficult, especially as you scale. Today, when discussing storage infrastructure at the Proton Mail office, the units of conversation are Terabytes and Petabytes. On top of all of this, you add the complication of properly implementing end-to-end encryption. Other aspects of emails such a spam filtering and email deliverability also need to be tackled. Of course, there are also mobile apps to build.

blogpost-v2release-2(new window)

These challenges are indeed daunting, which is why we brought together a dozen incredibly smart scientists and engineers from CERN, MIT, Harvard, Stanford, Caltech, and ETH Zurich to pull it off. Such a monumental undertaking also requires resources. This is why we raised 2 million Swiss Francs to supplement the 500,000 Swiss Francs we raised through crowdfunding. With this institutional support from foundations backed by the State of Geneva and the Swiss Federal government, we have a strong balance sheet. Proton Mail has more than enough financing to continue development until we introduce paid premium accounts.

For the Lavaboom users searching for an alternative, we are happy to tell you that email privacy is alive and well. We know many of you are looking to transition quickly so we are happy to provide priority access to existing Lavaboom users. Simply sign up for a Proton Account(new window) and then email us at contact@proton.me and we will expedite sending you an invitation.

You will be joining over half a million people from around the world who have already signed up for Proton Mail to get free and easy to use secure email. While we have purposely limited the size of our beta, in the coming months, we will opening up Proton Mail to millions of others worldwide who want to take back their online privacy. With your support privacy is not only surviving, it is thriving.

Protect your privacy with Proton
Create a free account

Share this page

Andy Yen(new window)

Andy is the founder and CEO of Proton. He is a long-time advocate for privacy rights and has spoken at TED, Web Summit, and the United Nations about online privacy issues. Previously, Andy was a research scientist at CERN and has a PhD in particle physics from Harvard University.

Related articles

What was your first pet’s name? In what city were you born?  We’ve all had to answer these questions to reset a long-forgotten password, but consider how that works. Much of this information is easy to find for others (or easily forgotten by you), m
In the early days when Proton started, we often received a question along the lines of “I love the product and what Proton stands for, but how do I know you will still be around to protect my data 10 years from now?”  Ten years and 100 million accou
Credential stuffing is a popular type of cyberattack where attackers take login credentials and use them on thousands of websites, hoping to fraudulently gain access to people’s accounts. It’s an effective attack, but fortunately, one that’s easy to
With Skiff abruptly shutting down operations, many people are on the lookout for alternatives that don’t compromise on privacy — and won’t suddenly disappear. People were attracted to Skiff because it promised privacy, no ads, end-to-end encryption,
Skiff is dead. On Feb. 9, the email company Skiff announced it was being bought by Notion. Many Skiff customers have been shocked by this news, as their inboxes have been sold out from under them. Skiff gave people six months to export their data be
Looking into the Dropbox privacy policy
Dropbox was the first mainstream cloud storage provider, and still the biggest player on the market, with 700 million users in 2022. We took a dive into Dropbox’s privacy policy to see how well the company protects the personal data of those millions