An updated Proton is coming

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Earlier this year, we shared how Proton’s services will evolve to better serve you. This evolution is vital as it will allow us to address several demands that the Proton community has raised, both in the 2022 survey and earlier. 

Ensuring that Proton’s services complement each other is necessary for delivering on the Proton community’s demands. Updating our apps will enable us to strengthen the integrations between Proton services and lay the groundwork for the future. As changes will be coming to nearly all Proton apps and websites, we want to give you a sense of what’s coming.  

When are changes coming?

We expect to start rolling out updates starting next week.

What is changing?

Our visual identity

We’re updating the look and feel of all Proton’s services (ProtonMail, ProtonVPN, Proton Calendar, and Proton Drive) to be consistent. This new look will allow everyone to visually understand that all Proton services are part of the same family. 

More email address options

Your existing ProtonMail email addresses are not changing, and you can continue using them to send and receive secure email. However, last month we also made @proton.me addresses available, and you can add an @proton.me address to your account for free. 

The email addresses that we use to send email communications to you (such as newsletters, password reset emails, notifications, etc.) will be updated to come from the @proton.me domain instead of @protonmail.com to reflect the fact that Proton services go beyond mail these days. As before, all emails from Proton will arrive starred in your inbox, so you know it is from us (if an email from us is not starred, it is likely a phishing email).

Improved Proton plans

Look out for news about our paid plans in response to your feedback. There will be no price changes for existing subscribers (even when you renew), and all plans will be upgraded to provide more storage and features for our existing subscribers. 

More storage has been one of the most requested features, especially with Proton Drive now in beta. As always, we will continue to offer free versions of all Proton services to ensure privacy is accessible to everyone.

Why now?

Ever since we launched ProtonVPN, ProtonMail has increasingly become just “Proton” to many people. As more Proton services continue to be developed in the coming years, building an identity around Proton is essential to bring consistency to all our present and future privacy services. 

What’s next?

While many product changes are coming to Proton, as we discussed in our eight years of Proton blog post, what stays the same is just as important as what’s changing. Proton will always remain free, open source, transparent, independent, neutral, and community-first. Just as in 2014, our vision is still to build a better internet where privacy is the default and where everyone is in control of their data.

As we head into the second half of 2022, we plan to roll out many new features and improvements. 

We will fulfill long-standing community requests, such as hardware token 2FA, better integration between Mail and Calendar, and the launch of Proton Drive with support for more platforms. Thank you for joining our fight for a better, more private internet. There’s no Proton without the Proton community, and we look forward to embarking on the next stage of Proton’s journey together with you.

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