Proton Mail iOS app goes open source!

Ben Wolford

Share this page

We’re happy to announce that the Proton Mail iOS app is now fully open source. 

We believe in transparency, the power of community, and building a more private and secure future for all. That’s why our web app has been open source since 2015(new window), and it’s why we have contributed to the open source community by maintaining cryptographic libraries for the JavaScript(new window) and Go(new window) programming languages.

Now we’re taking the next step by open sourcing our iOS app. You can find the code on our Github page(new window)

Why open source?

At Proton, security is our overriding priority, particularly because of the many dissidents and activists who use our service(new window). Our emphasis on security extends to all areas of our work, from our use of end-to-end encryption(new window), to the way we engineer our applications. As part of our commitment to security, we are putting all of our software through rigorous, independent third-party audits.

Already there are third-party audits for OpenPGPjs(new window) and GopenPGP(new window), our open source cryptographic libraries. Earlier this year, we engaged the renowned security firm SEC Consult(new window) to conduct an independent audit of Proton Mail’s iOS application. We are now making our iOS app open source now that it has been independently vetted. For more information, read the full iOS app audit report.

Open source provides transparency and accountability to the Proton community. Allowing people to see and review our code increases trust in both the security of the platform and our commitment to develop a more secure and private Internet. By making our code available to the world, and with the help of our bug bounty program(new window), we can leverage the global Proton community to make our software as secure as possible.

Open source at Proton Mail

We strongly believe in open source, and we are committed to open sourcing all of our client software. Our web app has been open source(new window) since 2015, and since we made our iOS app open source, we have published the code for our desktop Bridge app(new window), our Android app(new window), and all the Proton VPN apps(new window).

This means that all Proton apps that are out of beta are open source.

In addition to making our iOS app open source, we have also documented and published our iOS security model(new window). This is important to us because raw code without documentation can be almost unintelligible sometimes, and a documented security model will assist in rigorous assessment and review of our code by the public. Our iOS trust model(new window) is also available on our Github page.

There has been a recent increase in state-sponsored malware attacking iOS, and in some cases specifically targeting Proton Mail users. Our iOS security model also highlights exactly what we are doing to give Proton users a higher level of security compared to typical apps. In particular, we have implemented safeguards which allowed the Proton Mail iOS app to protect against a recent malware targeting Tibetans and Uyghurs (see our security advisory(new window)).

Making our code freely accessible to the developer community also encourages innovation in the field of privacy tech. Developers are free to implement and build upon the methods that we have documented and published. We believe that when developers work together to solve real-world privacy challenges, everyone benefits, and we hope that the publication of our code will result in safer and more robust iOS apps.

We’re excited to share our code, and we look forward to hearing your feedback on Github or directly via email at contact@proton.me.

Best Regards,
The Proton Mail Team

You can get a free secure email account(new window) from Proton Mail here.

We also provide a free VPN service(new window) to protect your privacy.

Proton Mail and Proton VPN are funded by community contributions. If you would like to support our development efforts, you can upgrade to a paid plan(new window). Thank you for your support.

Protect your privacy with Proton
Get a free account

Share this page

Ben Wolford

Ben Wolford is a writer at Proton. A journalist for many years, Ben joined Proton to help lead the fight for data privacy.

Related articles

From having too many inboxes to manage to switching to a new email provider, there are many reasons why you’d want to delete your Gmail account. You might even be concerned that Google is abusing your privacy. Thankfully, you can delete your Gmail a
The first month of 2023 has brought brutal layoffs from Big Tech, a potential ban of TikTok in the US, and another Twitter breach. But the biggest development of this new year has to be the ascent of ChatGPT.  The chatbot can produce remarkably huma
Hackers were able to steal account details from over 200 million Twitter users and posted the database on a hacking forum in early January 2023. These details include users’ email addresses and Twitter handles, allowing people to potentially identify
From your online shopping receipts to financial statements, your emails contain a great deal of sensitive information about your life, interests, and daily schedule. If you’re concerned about your online privacy, it’s therefore vital to keep your inb
At Proton, we’re committed to building privacy-focused products that are convenient to use and improve your productivity. Last year, we released the new mobile apps for Proton Calendar and Proton Drive, letting you manage your schedule and upload imp
Most email services aren’t secure and limit attachment file sizes, but there are ways to send large files securely. If you’ve ever tried attaching multiple images or video files to an email, you’ll know that it doesn’t always work. We explain ways t